Scattered Thoughts on The Paper Chase

the-paper-chase I recently rewatched The Paper Chase, currently streaming on Netflix. This is one of the many movies my dad recommended to me when I was in my teens and starting to get interested in older and different types of movies, so it's one I tend to associate pretty strongly with him. (When I imagine my dad in college, the image is partly informed by Timothy Bottoms in a mustache and corduroy.) Most of dad's recommendations were from the 1970s, especially the middle of the decade, which makes sense now: he was then in his early 20s and paying attention to pop culture in a way he wouldn't when he started a family. Among his other recommendations when I was young: The Conversation, The Sting, both Godfather movies, All the President's Men, The French Connection.

The Paper Chase is still pretty good, and it holds up more than 40 years later thanks to the dynamic between Hart (Bottoms) and Professor Kingsfield (John Houseman). It's a little loose around the edges, and it paradoxically feels a little less structured even as it works toward the final exam that provides the story's main goal. But this kind of looseness also makes for a nice parallel with the inner lives of the students in the movie, who start out so bright and sharp and slowly lose their way as the first year of law school makes dull tools of them all. The relationship subplot between Hart and Susan (Lindsay Wagner), Kingsfield's daughter, which seemed so impenetrable and adult the first time I saw the film, now feels thin and one-sided. Wagner gives a few great moments that provide some sad depth to her character, but the story doesn't quite know what to do with her, and the film is weirdly silent on Hart's apparent inability to recognize the perverse, possessive thrill he gets from intimately knowing the offspring of the teacher he will never figure out. To writer-director James Bridges' credit, though, Hart's pretty clearly a dick for most of his interactions with Susan, and he pays for it. He's not made out as a hero or anything.

It's a solid movie, though, with some good performances and a good story. It's shot by Gordon Willis, so there are some gorgeous compositions you might not expect, from the dim, cool look of Hart's room to the nice positioning and sizing of Hart and Kingsfield throughout the film as their relationship changes. (The score's also vintage mid-1970s adult-contemporary, which is probably the most dated thing about it.) Definitely worth revisiting.