Scattered Thoughts on Bad Marketing

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• A movie is never its marketing, but it's often worth looking at how movies are sold and what makes some of them successful while others struggle to find an audience. • Edge of Tomorrow is a crisp, fun, entertaining action-spectacle that's essentially Aliens crossed with Groundhog Day: a soldier named Cage (Tom Cruise) is tossed in with the front lines to fend off an alien invasion, and he dies in combat only to wake up at the beginning of the day to do it all over again. Every death "resets" the day, so Cage's mission is to figure out how to beat the aliens, save the world, and stop the cycle. In addition to all that sci-fi action, there's a decent amount of humor, or at least comic relief: little jokes and asides allow for breathing room, and they let the audience laugh and release a little of the tension that's been building during the more action-driven scenes. In other words, it's got good pacing, and a brain.

• Almost none of that is evident from the film's first full trailer:

The follow-up trailer isn't much better:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUmSVcttXnI

They deal in their way with the story's central gimmick, but they're almost incomprehensible. They don't do anything to distinguish the movie from other blockbusters, nor do they give the first clue to the film's verve or voice. Place it next to something like the ad for Guardians of the Galaxy, which used its own pop soundtrack for atmosphere, and you see how forgettable it is.

• Standard caveat here that all trailers are lies designed by marketers.

• Audiences are bought more often than they're earned, and there's a clear disconnect here between the movie and the way it's being presented to potential audiences. Even the title was a point of contention. Star Emily Blunt said that she was a fan of All You Need Is Kill, the title of the comic that inspired the film, but even more curiously, Warner Bros. seemed to attempt to retitle the film for home video. The film's tagline of "Live. Die. Repeat." — which is used prominently in the trailers — takes center stage on the Blu-ray/DVD cover, while iTunes and Amazon both list its title as Live Die Repeat: Edge of Tomorrow:

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• The movie's name didn't change, though. When the title finally displays (at the end of the movie), it's still just Edge of Tomorrow.

• This is an amazingly insecure and weird move on the part of the studio. It assumes that audiences stayed away because the found the title generic (which it is), and not, more accurately, because they didn't know what kind of movie they'd be getting. There's nothing in the ads to stylistically or tonally distinguish Edge of Tomorrow from the overwrought, almost hilariously serious promotions for the films that were released just before it, like Godzilla or X-Men: Days of Future Past, or shortly afterward, like Transformers: Age of Extinction or Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. It's pitched and sold as one more in a line of summer shoot-em-ups, when it's actually much more more fun and interesting than that. The trailer makes it feel like a somber march up Omaha Beach, when the film itself is robust, interesting, funny, exciting, and genuinely engaging. Getting scared and changing the movie's title isn't going to suddenly cause people to rediscover it. Rather, it causes confusion and makes the movie feel that much more like an uncertain proposition. How good can it really be, we'll wonder, if even the studio is trying to hide it from us?