Action as Narrative

the-rundown.jpg

Watching The Rundown recently, I was struck by how efficient and enjoyable the action scenes were. After a minute, I realized it was because each of the action scenes also functioned as a narrative one: that is, the story moved forward with the action, and it was different when the action stopped. This is a fundamental requirement for scenes like this, but so many modern action movies ignore it. If you can pull any scene out of a movie and not change the narrative, or if you can drop a scene in a different part of a movie, that scene needs to go. Every scene is a miniature arc, and it moves the story forward. This is easy to grasp when thinking about regular old dramatic scenes of, say, two people talking, or going out to dinner, or driving somewhere, or negotiating for something, or really anything. But the rule[footnote]All rules can be broken if they're broken the right way. Malick communicates in tone poems, but they still cohere in their own way.[/footnote] holds for special genres like action or musicals, too. When the romantic lead bursts into song, he's going to use those verses to come to a conclusion: he should pursue his lover, or quit his job, or do whatever the story is offering him. Before the song, he's uncertain; when it's done, he knows what to do. That's progress.

Action movies, done right, work the same way. No matter how spectacular or extravagant the action, it has to push the story along. Die Hard is, as always, a good example. When John McClane squares off against his first terrorist, it's not just a fight scene, but a move forward for the script. When the scene is over, McClane knows more about who he's up against, he starts to plan counterattacks, he makes decisions about what to do next, etc. If you removed the fight, and went right from "terrorist stalks McClane" to "McClane, now inexplicably bloodied, walks through the building," you'd have a gap. The action scene fits.

The Rundown knows this and acts accordingly. When Beck (Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson) fights a group of rebels in the Amazon rainforest, he's not just filling screen time, but saving his life and forging a new alliance in the process. When he and his cohorts find an ancient treasure and cause a cave-in, they emerge from the accident with the treasure in hand. If they didn't, there'd be no reason for the cave-in. Everything has a reason for being, which is part of what makes the film so enjoyable.[footnote]It's also got a nice energy and a sense of genuine adventure, as well as a solid cast topped by The Rock (eminently charming) and Seann William Scott (perennially underrated).[/footnote]

A lot of modern action movies forget this, and they string together action scenes that are designed to smother the viewer but that don't have much reason for being. There's a car chase scene in Captain America: The Winter Soldier that doesn't change the story but merely prolongs the inevitable. The 2009 Star Trek comes to mind, too: quite a few of its action scenes could be taken out with no change on the story. When Kirk and Scotty beam aboard the Enterprise late in the film, Scotty winds up in a tube filled with water, and Kirk has to race to free him. Take that out, and they still make it to the ship, and they still get apprehended by security. It doesn't do anything but pad the run time. Related to this, a lot of modern action movies (especially Marvel's) often operate in bad faith by assuming that, if you're watching, then you inherently care about all these characters and know their backstories and are just excited to see them do stuff. But The Rundown is its own, self-contained world, so it has to do the work of introducing characters to the viewer and then keeping the viewer invested through drama. This, again, is 101-level stuff, but it gets overlooked so often in today's tentpole market that it's almost startling to see a movie that does it right.

Action is narrative. When an action movie bears this in mind, the action feels exciting and propulsive. When it doesn't, the action feels cursory and forgettable. Story is above all.